JESSE NEUMAN____________________trumpet+cornet+live electronics

SILENT Z: "Brooklyn prog-modern post jazz"

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On saxist Pete Robbins’s siLENT Z project, highly developed harmony, complex meter and searing improv merge with a world of experimental loops, ambient soundscapes, hard beats and general abandon. The ’70s term jazz-rock doesn’t cut it, so the best description of this outfit is probably the artist’s own: “Brooklyn prog-modern (post)jazz.”

-Time Out New York

Altoist Pete Robbins' Do The Hate Laugh Shimmy functions like a treatise on synthesis, where disparate influences are not so much juxtaposed as woven together with style and grace. This CD makes a clear statement that these are times that celebrate a storied history of musical innovation. What felt like a gradual exploration of evolving alternatives in the 20th Century is now reaching a level of refinement, where today's innovators are synthesizing the work of predecessors who had done the same themselves. While this is clearly a jazz record through and through, this is a form of jazz that's created by someone who came up listening to popular music of his day—and at this point, that means guitar-based rock music from the 1990s. Some of the more contemporary influences that are listed on Robbins' bio include glitch-based 500th-generation sound artists like The Books or Autechre and art rock like Deerhoof and Dirty Projectors.   Eclecticism is often used to create a sense of over-saturation, but here, the interaction of contrasting influences never gives the listener the sense of dizziness that often results from more stark juxtaposition. Robbins has created music where his instrumental virtuosity and that of his constituents serves as a focal point and binding agent. This gives sustainability and depth to the music, creating a unified beauty that seamlessly integrates a feeling of familiarity with a wide array of unlikely stylistic inflections.


-By Wilbur MacKenzie, All About Jazz